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Monday, July 22, 2013

The FORP Official Report - Part 2

July 17, 2013
Day 3


Fitting the dovetailed nuts into the legs.Will Myers nailed these.



Brad cutting his top to length. And looking a bit unsure of his work.


Bo and Tracy running Bo's long rails through the planer.



A piece of lead shot in the long runner. Bo surmised it must have been there since the Napoleanic Wars.


Smiles all around. This was the first pass on Bo's new 20" Martin jointer. 


Don and Wesley cutting dovetails.


Peter Ross' Roubo-style planing stops.


The Ross holdfasts.




I can't imagine that a shop in Roubo's time was much different. Loud, hot, gritty.




July 18, 2013
Day 4




Some of the stock was full of bold ray fleck. This is Chris Schwarz' vise leg. 






One of two of Bo's leg vises. These are outfitted with our Crisscross mechanism. We rubbed down the threads with parrafin and gave the vise a test run. Smooth as silk, and fast. These are 1.75 tpi. 




Will Myers chopping the garter mortise for Bo's front chop.




Jeff Matilsky working the shoulder of a double tenon. 





 Brian Buckner cutting tenon cheeks on the Tannewitz.


Thursday night was the farewell party. Bo brought in some local barbeque and everyone feasted. Roger brought out a framed print of Plate 11 for everyone to sign. 


  Then people started signing the huge 7' x 17' Plate 11 banner that hung in the shop through the entire week.



Bo's wife Sherry stopped at a local peach orchard Thursday morning and bought some peaches that had been picked that morning. She churned out fresh peach ice cream all afternoon and Bo served it up after the bbq. Yes, it was magically delicious.

July 19, 2013
Day 5


By Friday afternoon a few of the participants had already packed and gone, facing 10 hour drives back home. I ignored the clock and with the help of darn near all the remaining participants (plus a couple friends who showed up on Thursday) we worked on Bo's bench. No way we were leaving before we saw this beast assembled. 



Tracy using a router mortising fixture built from 80/20.








Paring for final fitting on the massive 6" x 8" legs for the 16' bench.




I can't express the satisfaction we all felt when the top lowered itself onto the legs under its own weight. The base joints were fit without glue or pegs, to allow some wiggle room for the double tenons through the top. As soon as the top was on, and the whooping and hollering had ceased, we immediately try to move the bench. It felt like the rock of Gibraltar, even without glue or drawbore pegs in the base joints. Truly awesome. 


The bench was moved outside to the freight scale. 1164 pounds. 


















 Bo Child's Plate 11 Roubo Partner's Bench
Length: 16'
Width: 27"
Height: 34"
Weight: 1164 lbs.
Legs: 6" x 8" 
Rails: 3-1/2" x 5-1/2"
Vises: 3-1/2" x 1.75 tpi French Oak screw 
with Benchcrafted Crisscross
Holdfast and planing stops (not yet installed) by Peter Ross


10 comments:

  1. A Benchcrafted Crisscross paired up with a Lake Erie Toolworks Wooden Vise Screw - what a formidable vise clamping combination!

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  2. When that top dropped...such satisfaction! What a great time!

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  3. This is all well and good,
    but once Bo's bench comes alive
    and begins looking for something to eat...
    then what?

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  4. Too cool. I especially like the lead shot embedded in the wood.
    Couple of questions:
    1)What's the tab on the side of the chop? (7th pic from bottom)
    2) You said you dropped the top prior to glueing etc, to allow for wiggle room, once it was in place, did you guys then take it apart to glue, or just peg the joints and call it a day?
    Thanks.
    Patrick

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the garter. Roubo doesn't mention one, but I think its necessary.

      We didn't take it apart. The base joints will be pegged. No glue in the bench.

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    2. I figured that's what it was but I wasn't sure. Thanks for the answer.

      Delete
  5. Is there a mobility kit available?

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  6. "Tracy using a router mortising fixture built from 80/20." I'm not familiar with the nomenclature "80/20." Does this refer to the aluminum stock used for the jig?

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  7. Awesome, love the pics and build.

    ReplyDelete