Saturday, January 28, 2012

Video - Inlay a Royal Dutchman



This past week my computer died. For three days I waited while parts arrived for the new one. Which meant I didn't have easy access to email or the internet.

Every evening after work for those three days I spent in the shop working on furniture projects. It was like the days before the internet when I would spend every night at the bench making stuff. It was great. I miss those simpler days

One of the projects I'm wrapping up is the Jefferson bookcase from Popular Woodworking Magazine. I'm dovetailing the cases from some European steamed beech. Now I know why Schwarz built his in pine. I'm not new to dovetailing hardwoods, but right now I'm pretty sick of it.


The lowest medium size case was glued up earlier this week, and a nasty internal split showed up. I have no idea where it came from. It was simply baffling that I chose that board to be one of the most prominent in the piece. But maybe I figured I'd fill it when I milled the stock. That was a couple months ago.


I'm ready for this project to be done, so I figure, why not have a little fun with it at this point? So I grab my gaylord of inlay (its actually more like a tackle box) and grab a piece that will cover the void. The piece was quite fancy, totally wrong for this simple dovetailed bookcase. It will hide under books.

Here's how I did it:

18 comments:

  1. I suppose if you get angry at the piece, it will become The Flying Dutchman.

    This is a projet on my list. I can't wait to see the result.

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  2. Jameel,

    Great job and wonderful demo in the video.

    Lee

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  3. VERY, VERY, VERY, GOOD!

    MR. PHILIP LAI

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  4. Well lit and well shot - also very "interesting" playlist in the background. I am sure that little burnishing tip is what makes the whole thing not implode when you remove the piece from the test fit. This is a key step I have not seen before. Thanks for sharing.

    Richard

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  5. Very nicely done Jameel! THANKS for showing your process.

    Yes, it may be "totally wrong" for this piece, but if we consider it a maker's mark, it's totally OK. Now, you have to place one of those on every piece in the future. :)

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  6. So give us your thoughts on those fancy chisels....

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  7. Nice work, thanx for the demo. Now how did u make the dutchman ....

    Dan

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  8. There were some great tips on how to do inlay. I especially like the one drop of super glue thingie. I just might try doing an inlay instead of a carpentry dutchman, of which I have done a lot.
    ralph

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  9. Thanks folks. Glad you got something out of it.

    The chisels I use are a combination of Lie-Nielsen Bevel Edge, a couple from Czeck Edge (these are great for detail work since they are short), and a couple shop-made tools I made from files. For this sort of work you almost have to make your own tools, although you can get 1/16" chisels now pretty easily. I have an Ashley Isles that I bought for this purpose some months ago. I only remembered it when I putting my tools away after doing this inlay!

    Here's how I make those little parquetry pieces:
    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/articleindex/precision-inlay-simple-tools

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Jameel. I thought I saw one of the new Lee Valley chisels at one point.

      And nice music! Quite an eclectic sampling.

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    2. The record player was on more than the TV when I was a kid. Dad had good taste and liked everything from E. Power Biggs to Brubeck and everything in between. I guess it rubbed off.

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  10. Incredible video. Thank you so much for making it!

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  11. Great video!
    Thanks, and I love the playlist.

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  12. I'm curious, why not just use a Benchcrafted logo to cover said void? Seriously, great video. Thank you for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. Because I would have had to make a BC logo first, and I was lazy that night. ;-)

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  13. Jameel

    Very snazzy. Every encounter with you is a learning experience. For the tight corners I modified a marking knife to have a longer tip, and inverted, it works perfectly to clean out those tight corners. I'll send you a pic.

    Is the edge of the inlay square or tapered?

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    1. Don, that's what my elementary principle used to say every time I'd end up in his office!

      The marking knife sounds like a great solution. And I'm so glad you asked about the edge of the inlay. I knew someone would ask. The answer is no in this case, but for "serious" work I do take the inlay and plane a slight bevel on each edge, tapered in at the bottom, so the knife line is ever so slightly smaller than the inlay's outline. Couple that with the burnishing technique and you get an inlay that looks like it grew in the tree.

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  14. Please make more videos. I'd pay for them.

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