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Friday, February 12, 2016

What We're Working on in 2016


Its been a couple years since we came out with a new product. Here's everything we're working on, and hoping to produce in 2016. We're a small company, but we've got lots of ideas for new tools. Cranking out new stuff isn't difficult. But nailing it is. And we won't make something unless we've put our guts into it, and make sure its something we'd be delighted with in our own shop.

First up, the Etau.

Funny name, great vise. Here's why. The etau (which simply means "vise" in French) is a bit like the carver's vise we produced as a limited run in 2013, but is more versatile and handy since it can be clamped to almost any bench or table in just a few seconds. It's a great high vise, and a great portable vise. We wrote about the vise almost three years ago when we produced a one-off for the Handworks event in Amana. Since then, that prototype has seen a fair amount of use in the Benchcrafted test shop, and for the past year it's been mounted on one corner of planemaker Ron Brese's shop, where he uses the etau to shape plane totes and accomplish lots of other close work that the etau is well-suited for. If you've never used a vise the raises work to chest height, you will love the etau.

Right now we're working out a few minor bugs and tweaking the design to make this vise really sweet. It will incorporate some features from the carver's vise, and some from our Classic Leg Vise. The etau will be a regular item, not a limited run like the carver's vise. We think it's just about the perfect auxiliary vise for doing close work that requires more control. Let's not forget the cool factor. This thing looks great hanging out at the back corner of your bench.

One thing we're not 100% on. The name. "Etau" doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. We'll get this sorted eventually.


The Benchcrafted Planing Stop

This is something that's been cooking on the back burner for a while. But our upcoming set of Classic Workbench Plans forced us to kick this little guy to the front of the line.

The Benchcrafted planing stop is a dirt simple thing. Could you make one in your own shop during an episode of Magnum P.I.? Of course. But we're hoping to make this one cheap enough that you can spend that hour making the wood parts and chopping a big mortise in your bench instead. Right now the only commercial planing stops available are made by blacksmiths. Those are quite nice (and we recommend them) but we needed one of our design for the Classic workbench. Obviously it will work with other benches too.

Figuring out a way hold a planing stop securely to the wood block without it eventually wiggling loose or rotating was pretty easy. We borrowed the idea from our own barrel nuts. Doubling up the bolts prevents the stop from rotating, and keeps it securely cinched down.

These are just about to go into production and should be ready to purchase by the time the tulips start emerging.



M Series Moxon Vise

Sorry, we don't have any pictures of these yet, since we haven't made any. We've long wanted to do a run of fully machined Moxon vises, not only because they would look outstanding, but also because we've have a few requests for them. These will use the same fully machined handwheel as our Tail Vise M vise, only machined to run on the acme screws of the Moxon vise. We can imagine a Moxon M made with rosewood or richly finished mahogany. Maybe a little overkill, but we can't resist. These won't be cheap since our M series handwheels take forever and a day to machine to a high level. And there are two of them. Expect these to be a little less than double the price of a standard Moxon.

These won't be a regular item, but only a one-time run. And this will likely be the first item we make where we take pre-orders before we do the run. If you're interested, drop a note in the comments section. It will help us gauge how many we produce.



Classic Workbench Plans

Read about these here.




27 comments:

  1. Would there be a way to machine a groove around the base of the moon handles? That way a peice of metal can be screwed to the vise face to capture the handles and automatically retract the vise face when handles are loosened?

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    1. A garter on a Moxon vise is completely unnecessary.

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  2. Finally, the Etau! Great! And the Planing Stop. Sounds good. I am happily feeling poorer already.

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  3. Jameel,
    I'm in for a set of the fully machined Moxon hand wheels! (And the Etau too!)
    Roger Green

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  4. Jameel, I'm IN for the etau, planing stop and the M Series Moxon Vice!

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  5. I want the Etau and the Moxon M too!
    Thanks, David Luckensmeyer

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  6. Can you tell us the finished dimensions of the wood parts for the étau? Just so I can find some proper wood in advance. Hopefully something that will match my carver's vise, which I received a few weeks ago BTW (and thank you for the extra thing!)

    As far as the name is concerned, I'm fine with the pronunciation, but the name itself could be a bit more specific. The definition of Étau is quite broad, it could be anything!

    Portable French vise? Detail vise? La Forge Royale benchtop vise? Mini-crisscross? Just tell me when to stop!

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  7. You could make the name easier to pronounce, as well as make it more up-to-date: the eToe.

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  8. Up until now, the lack of a Moxon M made my decision to (eventually) purchase the cast iron bench package easy - the OCD in me must have matching hardware for the bench and the moxon, even though I like the machined look better. Now that the Moxon M is on the table, I must reluctantly say I would definitely buy the Moxon M when it's available.

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  9. The Etau is one of the most useful tools in my shop. It's use it not just limited to shaping plane totes, even though I can't imagine how I did that work without the Etau, fairing curves on furniture parts, refining the curves on plane sides, etc. It get's used any day the doors are unlocked.

    Ron Brese

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  10. I would be interested in the special run Moxon.

    Mike C

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  11. Also, for someone starting to get into more hand tool work (like dovetails), would you suggest the etau or the moxon as the first auxiliary vise to get?

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  12. The M moxons would be a great addition.

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  13. Put me down for the Etau and the planning stops...I am still sorry I missed the carvers vise...

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  14. An Etau and planning stop for me as well

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  15. I'd buy the etau and the moxon m series. But the etau should be able to have a matching wheel instead of a bar as an option

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  16. Hi Jameel - put me down as interested in the Etau and Moxon M

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  17. Hi Jameel- count me in for the Moxon M wheels and the planing stops

    Scott Johnson

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  18. I am in for the Moxon M and the planning stops.

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  19. Put me down for a Moxon M and a planning stop.

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  20. Hi Jameel, you can add me to the list for the Moxon M and the planning stops.

    Scott Johnson

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  21. Add me to the list as well for the Moxon M

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  22. Definitely interested in the Moxon M.

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  23. I just ordered M bench hardware and would like a set of M Moxon hardware and the planing stop also. David Hunstad 48306

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  24. I just ordered M set of bench hardware. I would like a set of the M Moxon and planing stop also.

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  25. I would like to be added to the list for the Moxon M

    Norb Kelly

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  26. Add me to the list for the Moxon M, and the planing stop.

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